It should be consumer demand that drives TV stations to a digital platform like Walesi – Richard Naidu.


Following the cut-off of analogue TV transmission in many parts of the country, some residents of Naivikinikini in Lami who do not have access to Welsh set-top boxes connected to their home TVs are disappointed because they no longer have access to the channels. of TV.

Frances Qounadovu said it was the talk of the town for them as no notice had been given about the changeover.

She says the majority of homes have the Walesi decoder but don’t have the UHF antenna because it’s expensive.

Qounadovu says it had a big impact on them.

Qounadovu says only 10 of Naivikinikini’s 60 families have access to Welsh channels.

Fiji Television Limited announced on Tuesday that its free analog TV transmitter in Tamavua, Suva and Sabeto in Nadi will be closed from this Wednesday after the government decision to switch companies from analog to the digital platform, Walesi .

This means that residents of the affected areas will only be able to access the Fiji One TV signal through a Walesi set-top box connected to their home TV with a UHF antenna or through the Walesi app or through a Walesi satellite dish connected to the digital set-top box.

Residents of affected areas can no longer access Fiji One TV or any other TV signal through an antenna connected to their TV. In a market announcement, the publicly traded company said the shutdown of analog transmitters in Suva and Nadi is in line with communications from the Communications Ministry and is in line with the first phase of the analog to digital switchover process. planned by the government. television, Wales.

Fiji TV reports that the affected areas in the Central and Eastern Divisions are Pacific Harbor, parts of Beqa, Navua, Naboro, Wainadoi, Lami, Delainavesi, all areas of Suva, all areas of Nasinu, all areas of Nausori, parts of Korovou and Natovi, parts of Ovalau, parts of Koro, parts of Batiki and Moturiki, affected areas in the Western Division include Nadi, Lautoka, parts of Ba, parts of Mamanuca and Yasawa and parts of the coral coast, and Vunisea and its surroundings in Kadavu.

The company claims that Fiji One viewers in Ba and Vanua Levu will continue to access Fiji One through the analog platform, but are strongly advised to switch to Walesi.

We sent questions to Fiji TV about the financial impact on the business, what is the value of the assets of the closed transmitters and what would all those assets be used for, what fees Fiji TV has to pay Walesi for their channels on the platform, how will this financially affect the company, has the company entered into negotiations on the shutdown of analog transmitters and what advice has the company given to the Ministry of Communications on the effects on the business and people who do not have Walesi set-top boxes, antennas or satellite dishes, their thoughts on the benefits of leaving analog transmitters on for those without Walesi set-top boxes and there have been discussions about what type of license Fiji TV has and have there been any changes since the transmission is moved to the Walesi platform.

Fiji Television Limited released another market announcement stating that it has been granted a television broadcast operator license for a period of 12 years effective Wednesday, December 1, 2021.

It indicates that the license was granted today by the Attorney General and Minister of Communication, Aiyaz Saiyed-Khaiyum, under the 1992 Law on Television and Online Broadcasting.

The license authorizes Fiji TV to operate a free-to-air broadcasting service.

Chairman Deepak Rathod is pleased with the 12-year broadcast license as it will boost investor confidence in Fiji TV as a listed company.

We sent questions to the Acting Permanent Secretary for Communications, Tupou’tuah Baravilala, on the Fijian TV market announcement.

We are still awaiting the response from Fiji TV and the Ministry of Communications.

Related story:

FBC will shut down its analog transmitters in Sabeto and Nakobalevu tomorrow

Riyaz Sayed-Khaiyum says picture and sound quality will be better

By: Vijay Narayan

Tuesday 11/30/2021

The Fijian Broadcasting Corporation will shut down its free-to-air analogue television transmitter in Sabeto and Nakobalevu from tomorrow, following the government’s decision to switch companies from analogue to the digital platform, Walesi.

This means that people in the affected areas will only be able to access the FBC TV signal via a Walesi decoder connected to their home TV with a UHF antenna or via the Walesi app or via a Walesi satellite dish connected to the set -top case. .

From tomorrow, residents of disaster areas will no longer be able to access the FBC TV signal via an antenna connected to their television.

FBC CEO Riyaz Sayed-Khaiyum said the switch was good for people as the picture and sound quality would be better.

Sayed-Khaiyum says that because of the work done by Walesi, more Fijians in these areas will have better access to television.

He says there is no financial impact on the company and that instead of paying for the maintenance of their transmitters, this responsibility will now be transferred to Walesi who will receive a license fee from the television companies.

FBC CEO says they haven’t sold any of their transmitters to Walesi.

Mai TV will shut down its analogue transmitters in Lololo, Sabeto and Nakobalevu at midnight

Simpson says any increase in Walesi’s fees will have a severe impact on TV broadcasting business in Fiji

By: Shanil Singh

Tuesday 11/30/2021

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Mai TV will shut down its free analogue TV stations in Lololo, Sabeto and Nakobalevu at midnight tonight following the government’s decision for businesses to switch from analogue to the digital platform, Walesi.

This means that people in the affected areas will only be able to access the Mai TV signal via a Walesi decoder connected to their home TV with a UHF antenna or via the Walesi app or via a Walesi satellite dish connected to the -top case set. .

From tomorrow, residents of disaster areas will no longer be able to access the Mai TV signal via an antenna connected to their television.

Mai TV director Stanley Simpson said the change would bring benefits, but that he would have appreciated a little more time to do so and that any increase in transmission costs by Walesi will have a severe impact on the business of TV broadcast in the country.

He says the government is trying to move forward and Mai TV will have to agree to the terms of the license.

Simpson adds that they are still waiting to find out how much they will be charged by Walesi and for the Fijian Competition and Consumer Commission to look into the matter.

He adds that they are still in the process of determining how this will impact the business financially.


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