Endicott can install license plate readers at village entrances

Several license plate readers could be installed at various locations in the village of Endicott to assist law enforcement.

Mayor Linda Jackson said Police Chief Patrick Garey was working with a company to develop a proposal that would include plate readers and cameras.

Speaking on WNBF radio, Jackson said she thought installing plate readers at the main entry points to the village would be “very beneficial”. She said the devices would be linked to the Broome County Emergency Dispatch Center.

A license plate reader on Main Street in Binghamton just east of the village of Johnson City. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

A license plate reader on Main Street in Binghamton just east of the village of Johnson City. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

The mayor said the plate readers could make it easier for Endicott police to apprehend people suspected of committing a crime in a nearby community.

Jackson said the village would likely consider placing four plate readers at the village’s busy entry points on Main Street, Watson Boulevard and Route 26. She hopes a folder with cost estimates will be available soon. to be presented to the village council.

The city of Binghamton has installed a network of about two dozen plate readers, mostly at entry points.

When then-Mayor Richard David announced the initiative in 2017, he said it would cost around $700,000.

David said every vehicle entering Binghamton would be “scanned and cross-checked against local, state and federal databases.” The city has released little information on the usefulness of the plate readers since their installation.

A license plate reader on Front Street near Prospect Street in Binghamton. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

A license plate reader on Front Street near Prospect Street in Binghamton. (Photo: Bob Joseph/WNBF News)

Contact Bob Joseph, WNBF News reporter: [email protected] or (607) 545-2250. For the latest story development news and updates, follow @BinghamtonNow on Twitter.

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